Using Data for Program Improvement

Now What? From Outcomes to Implementation

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Karen Blase

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 

Presented as the closing plenary at the 2010 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

Our outcomes data collection systems are in place; now what? Let's celebrate our successes and start thinking about using the data to promote systems change and improve services for children and families. This presentation focused on how implementation science and systems change concepts can inform the timely and effective use of data to benefit young children with disabilities and their families.

Measuring and Improving Social-Emotional Development with the Pyramid Model: A Multi-Level Framework of Data Collection and Use

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Lisa Backer, Lise Fox, Vivian James, Kelly Pleasant, and Megan Vinh

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2011 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. Presenters implementing the pyramid model for social-emotional development discussed and provided examples of the tools they selected for measuring social-emotional outcomes, the data those tools generate, and how they are using the data for decision making at the child, practitioner, classroom, program, state, and national levels. This session presented how different combinations of assessment data can inform different decisions for improvement at all levels. Participants also joined in a discussion of how this framework for multi-level data collection and use can generalize to other child outcomes and State Performance Plan indicators.

Levels of Representativeness: How to Examine and Use Family Survey Data to Plan for Program Improvement

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Siobhan Colgan (NECTAC and ECO at UNC/FPG), Batya Elbaum (DAC FL), and Melissa Raspa (ECO at RTI)

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2010 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

Participants were provided an opportunity to examine sample data and discuss different aspects of the issue of representativeness. These included:
1) response rates- did everyone who was supposed to respond to the survey actually respond?
2) proportional representation- how close do the response rate percentages match the comparison data for different variables of interest?
3) within subgroups, are respondents "representative" of their group? ; and
4) how do we use this information to target program improvement issues?

Know Thy Children Well: A Three State Panel Discussion About Early Childhood Data Collection

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Baron Holmes, Susan Illgen, Phil Koshkin, and Philip Sirinides

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2011 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. A three state panel engaged participants in discussion and shared lessons learned about their experiences in collecting, analyzing, and linking early childhood data with public school data. Maryland, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina are three premier states whose processes for ensuring data collected birth to school age are linked to important K-12 and post-secondary outcomes. The objectives of the session were: (1) experience discourse among colleagues about the importance of quality early childhood data collection and linkage to K-12, including exemplary uses of early childhood data among children with disabilities; (2) hear from state experts about their state early childhood data systems and how they have used data to impact program, funding, and training decisions; and (3) develop an awareness about how different approaches for linking agency data across programs can improve child outcomes and lead to changed local and state policy.

Interpreting and Using Child Outcome Data

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler (ECO at SRI)

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. Discussed the how and why of good data, as well as the benefits for child and family outcomes, and program improvement.

Incorporating Early Childhood into Longitudinal Data Systems: What, Why and How

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler, ECO at SRI and Lynne Kahn, ECO at FPG/UNC

Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

This session was presented at the OSEP Leadership Conference in Washington, DC. The purpose of this session was to present information on the value of including early childhood data in longitudinal data collection. 

Identifying and Promoting Family Outcomes at the Local Level

Type: 
Conference Session
Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2008 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

In this session, presenters representing three states (Illinois, Texas, and New York) shared different ways in which constructs and instruments developed to meet the OSEP reporting requirements on family outcomes can be used for program improvement at the local level.

How Can We Know What and How Much is Enough?

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler and Robin Nelson

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2011 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. The presenters shared a brief summary of a study done in Texas to better understand the type and amount of services recommended for IFSPs. The session provided opportunities for participants to discuss such questions as: In times of economic pressures, how much and what kinds of services are "enough" to make a difference? How will you know? What are implications for data analyses, policies, and guidance?

Helping Local Programs Improve Outcomes Performance Using the DAC Data Analysis Framework

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Lisa Backer, Sherry Franklin, Sharon Walsh, and Avisia Whiteman

Year: 
2012
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2012 Measuring and Improving Child and Family Outcomes Conference. How can states support the use of outcomes data at the local level to promote program improvement? In this session, two states shared how they implemented the Data Accountability Center (DAC) Analysis Framework to support local programs in analyzing data and using data for program improvement. The NC Part C program shared their work that focused on ensuring that families know their rights. Minnesota shared information about their 0-5 initiative that looked at both child and family outcomes and also more broadly across early childhood programs.

Helping Local Administrators and Providers Analyze and Use Their Outcome Data

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Jane Atuk, Lisa Backer, Fauna Hubble, and Lisa Balivet

Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2009 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

In this session, two states shared how they are preparing for local programs to use their child outcomes data to improve local Part C and 619 Services and results for children and families. Alaska shared how their data system is designed to assist local EI programs in reporting, understanding, and eventually using their data for program improvements. Minnesota shared their activities to support local leadership in conducting simple analyses for the purpose of pattern checking the quality of ECSE data.

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