Family Outcomes

Writing Quality IFSP Outcomes / IEP Goals and Linking to the Child Outcomes Measurement Processes

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathi Gillaspy, Anne Lucas, and Mary Louise Peters 

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2011 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. Presenters engaged participants in discussion and activities related to conducting functional assessment, developing meaningful IFSP outcomes/IEP goals, measuring the child and family outcomes, and the critical connections between these processes.

Welcome and Overview to the 2012 Conference

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler, Lynne Kahn, Christy Kavulic, Meredith Miceli, Rhonda Spence, and Michael K. Yudin 

Year: 
2012
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2012 Measuring and Improving Child and Family Outcomes Conference. As part of the opening address, presenters shared some background information and insights in their outcomes work.

Using Family Survey Data for Program Improvement

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Don Bailey, Jim Henson, Melissa Raspa, Pam Roush, and Maureen Sullivan

Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2009 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

This session shared guidance materials and offered suggestions for analyzing and using family survey data collected with a variety of different approaches for program improvement. Presenters from West Virginia and Vermont highlighted how they have begun using family survey data for program improvement and discuss lessons learned and suggestions to address the challenges that they have encountered.

Understanding and Using the Results from the NCSEAM Family Survey

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Batya Elbaum (NCSEAM)

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

This presentation discussed how to interpret the results from the NCSEAM Family survey and use the results for program planning and improvement.

To See What Condition Our Condition Is In: Aligning Child and Family Outcomes Across Early Learning and Development Systems

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Geoffrey Nagle and Cindy Oser 

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2011 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. This session enabled participants to explore the context and current opportunities for aligning child and family outcomes across health, early learning/development and family engagement. Speakers shared an example of how a shared vision and outcomes helped sustain and leverage funding and system improvement for Louisiana BrightStart, and facilitated participant discussion of strategies for creating and contributing to shared (cross system) outcomes and results for young children and families.

The ECO Family Outcomes Survey

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Nyle Robinson and Chelsea Guillen (IL Part C), Robin Nelson (TX Part C), Don Bailey (ECO at RTI International), and Murrey Olmstead and Melissa Raspa (RTI International)

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

The Family Outcomes Survey was developed to assess the five family outcomes recommended by the ECO Center. This presentation summarized recent revisions to the survey, discusses distribution strategies, gives examples of data collected, and describes next steps. The session concluded with a forum for other states to share their experiences and ideas regarding survey issues.

The Child and Family Outcomes Measurement Frameworks

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler and Donna Spiker (ECO at SRI)

Year: 
2012
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2012 Measuring and Improving Child and Family Outcomes Conference. Developed by the ECO Center and several partner states, the measurement frameworks provide a structure, including quality indicators, for a high quality state level measurement system that includes collecting valid data and using the information for program improvement at the local level. The frameworks and the corresponding self-assessments will be described along with various ways states can use them to plan and improve how they are measuring child and family outcomes. This session is targeted to those who are not familiar with the frameworks but all are welcome to join us for a discussion about how states can use the frameworks and the self-assessments.

Supporting Child and Family Outcomes Efforts through Technology

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Mary Beth Bruder, Larry Edleman, Melinda Raab, and Alice Ridgeway

Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2009 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

This session explored a variety of ways that technology is being used to provide professional development, build local capacity, enhance valid measurement of the child and family outcomes, and promote data quality to support states' work on child and family outcomes. The presenters illustrated the uses of a range of technological strategies including rapid elearning, digital video, web site design, and online courses.

Supporting and Engaging Families of Young Children with Disabilities: Eight Recommendations

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Don Bailey, ECO at RTI 

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 

This presentation was given at the US Department of Education and Department of Health and Human Services Listening and Learning Panel on Family Engagement. Eight recommendations are presented that address existing problems related to family support, engagement, and family outcomes. 

Strategies for Maintaining Data Quality Using Commercial Assessment Systems

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Barb Jackson (Univ of NE Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute), Nick Ortiz (CO Dept of Education), and Jan Thelan (NE 619) 

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2010 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

Many States use online assessment systems to collect, review, and analyze their child outcomes data. In this session, Nebraska and Colorado described methods of monitoring data quality through automatically generated reports and raw data available through the assessment systems. Both States reviewed how these strategies can be used at each level in the hierarchy (child, teacher, program, State), whether through random spot checks or more targeted, individualized checks.

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