Family Outcomes

Family Outcomes Framework and Self-Assessment Tool

Type: 
ECO Tools
Author/Presenter: 

ECO Staff

Year: 
2012
Abstract: 

This tool is designed to be used by state agencies to assess progress toward full implementation of a Family Experiences and Outcomes Measurement System for programs serving young children with delays and disabilities. The self-assessment allows users to download, enter and save their self-assessment data. 

What is the Future of Family Outcomes and Family-Centered Services?

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Bailey, D., Raspa. M., & Fox, L.

Year: 
2012
Abstract: 

Public Law 99-457 emphasized the central role of family support in programs serving young children with disabilities. In the 25 years since it passed, much work has been done to describe the principles and practices that characterize effective family support. However, how to effectively promote family outcomes through programs serving infants, toddlers, and preschoolers is less clear. In this article, the authors explain family-centered practices and summarize the data that supports using these practices. The authors also explain that early intervention and preschool programs are not held accountable for family outcomes; rather, they are limited to showing only that families are satisfied with services. Predicting that family outcomes will not be part of any national accountability effort in the near future (until research clearly shows that such outcomes ultimately will benefit children), the authors then suggest several areas where work is needed in order to advance the field so that they may make an informed policy decision about documenting family benefit.

The Need for Data on Child and Family Outcomes at the Federal and State Levels

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Hebbeler, K., & Barton, L. (2007). The need for data on child and family outcomes at the Federal and State levels. Young Exceptional Children Monograph Series , 9, 1-15.

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

This article describes issues related to the current federal requirements for reporting outcomes on children and families served through Part C and Section 619 of Part B of IDEA. Critical events leading up to the current requirements are summarized, followed by a discussion of efforts to design and implement state outcome measurements systems, and implications of outcome measurement for children, families, and the programs serving them.

SPP/APR Indicator Analysis Reports

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

The Early Childhood Outcomes Center

Abstract: 

These annual reports summarize progress across all states and jurisdictions based on data reported to OSEP in the February 2011 APRs (FFY 2010). The ECO Center prepares the annual reports for the child outcomes indicators for Part C and Part B, and the family indicator for Part C.

SPP/APR Indicator Analysis Report- Part C

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

The ECO Center staff

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 
The ECO Center completes analyses and prepares reports for the child outcomes indicators for Part C and Part B, and the family indicator for Part C. These reports summarize progress across all states and jurisdictions based on data reported in February 2010 (FFY 2008-2009).
 
In the Part C SPP/APR report, the child outcomes chapter (Indicator C3) is on pages 18-34 and the family outcomes chapter (Indicator C4) on pages 35-49.

Recommended Outcomes for Families of Young Children with Disabilities

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Bailey, D. B. Jr., Bruder, M.B., Hebbeler, K., Carta, J., Defosset, M., Greenwood , C., Kahn, L., Mallik, S., Markowitz, J., Spiker, D., Walker, D., and Barton, L. Journal of Early Intervention , 28 (4), 227-243.

Year: 
2006
Abstract: 

This article describes the process by which The Early Childhood Outcomes (ECO) Center generated outcomes by which the effectiveness of services for families could be assessed. This evidence-based, iterative process utilized extensive stakeholder input, and led to the identification of five family outcomes: (a) families understand their child's strengths, abilities, and special needs; (b) families know their rights and advocate effectively for their child; (c) families help their child develop and learn; (d) families have support systems; and (e) families are able to gain access to desired services and activities in their community. Discusses issues and challenges regarding family outcomes measurement.

Part C Family Survey Guide

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Mid-South Regional Resource Center (MSRRC)

Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

This guide was developed to assist states in developing improvement activities using their parent survey data in response to Indicator 4 of the Part C State Performance Plan (SPP). The purpose of the guide is to help states use the findings of their surveys to improve services, no matter what survey instrument is used (e.g., NCSEAM, state-developed, or ECO). The intent is to answer the questions, "What do the results mean?" and "How can we use this information to improve services?"

Outcomes Reported by Spanish-Speaking Families in Early Intervention

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Olmsted, M. G., Bailey, D. B., Raspa, M., Nelson, R., Robinson, N., Simpson, M. E., et al. (2010). Outcomes reported by Spanish-speaking families in early intervention. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 30(1), 46-55.

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 

This study uses data from two states to compare how families participating in early intervention who completed a Spanish version of the Family Outcomes Survey (FOS) (n = 291) compared with Hispanic (n = 486) and non-Hispanic (n = 2,363) families who completed the English version. In general, most families reported positive outcomes but there was variability in their responses. Families completing the survey in Spanish consistently reported lower outcome attainment than both Hispanic and non-Hispanic families completing the FOS in English. They also reported lower perceptions of the helpfulness of early intervention, but the three groups did not differ with regard to perceptions of family-centered practices. Factor analysis revealed that constructs assessed by the survey are similar for both the English and Spanish version of the survey. Hierarchical linear models analysis within the Spanish-language group indicated that family-centered practices were significantly related to family outcomes.

Measuring family outcomes: Considerations for large-scale data collection in early intervention

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Bailey, D., Hebbeler, K., Olmsted, M., Raspa, M., & Bruder, M. (2008). Measuring family outcomes: Considerations for large-scale data collection in early intervention. Infants & Young Children, 21 (3), 194-206

Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

Early-intervention programs are increasingly being asked to provide data showing effectiveness. Usually this means proving benefit for children, but here we argue that documenting benefit for families is also important. A recent national effort has led to the identification of 5 desired outcomes for families whose children participate in early-intervention programs. This article discusses issues and considerations in documenting family outcomes in the context of large-scale assessments, and describes the initial development of a survey instrument that could be useful in such efforts.

Measuring Family Outcomes in Early Intervention: Findings from a Large-Scale Assessment

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Raspa, M., Bailey, D. B., Nelson, R., Robinson, N., Simpson, M. E., Guillen, C., Olmsted, M., & Houts, R. (2010). Measuring family outcomes in early intervention: Findings from a large-scale assessment. Exceptional Children, 76(4), 496-510.

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 

This study reports data from a large scale assessment in which the Family Outcomes Survey was used with families participating in early intervention. The study was designed to determine how families describe themselves with regard to outcomes achieved, the extent to which outcomes are interrelated, and the extent to which child, family, and program factors are associated with outcomes. Although families reported positive outcomes, there was variability in their responses. Factor analysis revealed two areas where outcomes were clustered: 1. family knowledge and ability; and 2. family support and community services. Hierarchical linear models indicated race/ethnicity, income, time in early intervention, perception of early intervention, and family-centered services were related to family outcomes. Also discussed are recommendations on how to best use survey data.

Syndicate content