Data Collection

ECO Suggestions for Updating SPP Child Outcome Indicator Part B due February 2008

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

The Early Childhood Outcomes Center 

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Embedded within this sample SPP reporting form are suggestions for how states might document any changes in their outcome measurement systems since the February 2007 SPP, and how to describe their current approach toward meeting OSEP's Part B/619 child outcome reporting requirements.

Development and psychometric validation of the Family Outcomes Survey-Revised

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Bailey, D.B., Raspa, M., Olmstead, M.G., Noval, S.P., Sam, A.M., Humphreys, B.P. Journal of Early Intervention, 33 (1):6-23.

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

There are few psychometrically valid scales which exist to assess family outcomes and the helpfulness of early intervention. In this article, the authors describe the development and psychometric properties of the Family Outcomes Survey-Revised. This revision was prompted by three needs: 1. to create a new format that would be easier for parents to understand; 2. to revise and expand the survey items to provide more information for states to use in planning for program improvement; and 3. to demonstrate acceptable psychometric properties. Input from stakeholders as well as experts was used to identify concepts and develop candidate items. Data from a web-based survey conducted with families in two states were then used to assess the psychometric properties of candidate items. These activities produced a revised survey, whose sound psychometric integrity can be used to document family outcomes and identify areas for possible program improvement.

What do the Numbers Mean? Making Sense out of Outcome Data

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler, ECO at SRI 

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Results Matter State Conference. Provides information on how to transform assessment information into child outcome data that can be used for federal reporting and program improvement. 

Using Data to Track and Promote Outcomes for Young Children with Disabilities

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Presented by Kathy Hebbeler, ECO at SRI

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the SAMI-CCPRC Institute on the Intersection of Research, Policy, and Practice. This presentation provided an overview of the function of the Early Childhood Outcome Center, outlined the three child outcomes required by OSEP, and presented the federal reporting requirements for young children with disabilities. Additionally, trends in approaches to measuring child outcomes for Part C and Part B (619) programs were discussed. 

Using a Statewide Evaluation Tool for Child Outcomes and Program Improvement

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Susan Evans and Terry Harrison (NJ Part C)

Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2008 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

The presenters described New Jersey's implementation of one statewide evaluation tool to answer Indicator 3 (Child Outcomes). The session also provided information and time for discussion regarding the achievements and challenges that have emerged with the collection and reporting of child outcome data.

The Results Are In! Childhood Outcomes for OSEP EI and ECSE Programs

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Donna Spiker

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

This presentation, from the CCSSO-SCASS Meeting, includes an overview of the national data collected for 2010, state requirements and approaches, as well as how the data were compiled, quality, and next steps for states.

The ECO Family Outcomes Survey

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Nyle Robinson and Chelsea Guillen (IL Part C), Robin Nelson (TX Part C), Don Bailey (ECO at RTI International), and Murrey Olmstead and Melissa Raspa (RTI International)

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

The Family Outcomes Survey was developed to assess the five family outcomes recommended by the ECO Center. This presentation summarized recent revisions to the survey, discusses distribution strategies, gives examples of data collected, and describes next steps. The session concluded with a forum for other states to share their experiences and ideas regarding survey issues.

Target Setting for Child Outcomes Indicators

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Ruth Ryder (OSEP)

Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

Plenary session at the 2008 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. Ruth Ryder, OSEP, discussed considerations related to setting targets for child outcomes, including pros and cons of data collection, data quality, and state differences.

Supporting Child and Family Outcomes Efforts through Technology

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Mary Beth Bruder, Larry Edleman, Melinda Raab, and Alice Ridgeway

Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2009 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

This session explored a variety of ways that technology is being used to provide professional development, build local capacity, enhance valid measurement of the child and family outcomes, and promote data quality to support states' work on child and family outcomes. The presenters illustrated the uses of a range of technological strategies including rapid elearning, digital video, web site design, and online courses.

Strategies for Maintaining Data Quality Using Commercial Assessment Systems

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Barb Jackson (Univ of NE Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute), Nick Ortiz (CO Dept of Education), and Jan Thelan (NE 619) 

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2010 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

Many States use online assessment systems to collect, review, and analyze their child outcomes data. In this session, Nebraska and Colorado described methods of monitoring data quality through automatically generated reports and raw data available through the assessment systems. Both States reviewed how these strategies can be used at each level in the hierarchy (child, teacher, program, State), whether through random spot checks or more targeted, individualized checks.

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