Data Analysis

Parts B and C Data Meeting

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler, ECO at SRI International and Lynne Kahn, ECO at at FPG/UNC

Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

Presentations describe what the ECO Center has learned from the state APRs/SPPs submitted in 2007, and issues to consider in coming year(s). Also presents issues of quality data as related to the COSF, and illustrates what is happening around the country promoting high-quality data.

OSEP Initiatives on Early Childhood Outcomes

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler, ECO at SRI

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 

Presented at the Council of Chief State School Officers' (CCSO) Meeting to the State Collaboratives on Assessment and Student Standards (SCASS) on Early Childhood Education Assessment.  The conference session focused on federal requirements for early intervention and preschool special education reporting on child outcomes, approaches states are taking to measuring child outcomes, the current national data, and a look at the ECO framework and self-assessment document and process.

Measuring Child Outcomes: Preparing the 2008 APR for Indicators B7 and C3

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler (ECO at SRI) and Lynne Kahn (ECO at UNC/FPG), Ruth Ryder, and Jennifer Tschantz

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 OSEP National Early Childhood Conference. This session provided participants an opportunity to discuss the data analysis and reporting child outcomes for Indicators B7 and C3 in preparation for the February 2008 APR submission. OSEP and ECO staff presented relevant resources and information, followed by an open discussion where participants had the opportunity to ask questions and discuss options for data analysis and reporting on child outcomes.

Looking for Patterns in Child Outcomes Data: An Introductory Workshop on How to Examine Data for Red Flags

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Lauren Barton (ECO at SRI), Donna Noyes (NY Part C), and Cornelia Taylor (ECO at SRI)

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2010 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

The introductory workshop gave examples of different formats for looking at data, and participants discussed what patterns would be expected in high quality data. A representative from New York described her state'€™s experiences with analyzing patterns in their child outcomes data as a step in quality assurance and share examples from their findings. Participants worked with sample data in small groups to look for patterns, identify red flags, and determined whether additional analysis or quality assurance activities might be appropriate.

Bringing Longitudinal Data to Life: A Model from the Colorado Preschool Program

Type: 
Webinar
Author/Presenter: 

Nick Ortiz, Data Manager; Colorado Preschool Program & Results Matter, Colorado Department of Education and Kathy Hebbeler, ECO at SRI

Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

This session presents an overview of the Colorado Preschool Program and Results Matter, presents child and family data from Colorado, and discusses longitudinal data research questions and challenges.

Analysis Steps the Early Childhood Outcomes Center Used to Generate National Numbers for Categories A-E and the Summary Statements and Results

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Lynne Kahn

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

This paper presents background on the methodologies and processes used in determining the national results reported annually.

Know Thy Children Well: A Three State Panel Discussion About Early Childhood Data Collection

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Baron Holmes, Susan Illgen, Phil Koshkin, and Philip Sirinides

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2011 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. A three state panel engaged participants in discussion and shared lessons learned about their experiences in collecting, analyzing, and linking early childhood data with public school data. Maryland, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina are three premier states whose processes for ensuring data collected birth to school age are linked to important K-12 and post-secondary outcomes. The objectives of the session were: (1) experience discourse among colleagues about the importance of quality early childhood data collection and linkage to K-12, including exemplary uses of early childhood data among children with disabilities; (2) hear from state experts about their state early childhood data systems and how they have used data to impact program, funding, and training decisions; and (3) develop an awareness about how different approaches for linking agency data across programs can improve child outcomes and lead to changed local and state policy.

Incorporating Early Childhood into Longitudinal Data Systems: What, Why and How

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler, ECO at SRI and Lynne Kahn, ECO at FPG/UNC

Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

This session was presented at the OSEP Leadership Conference in Washington, DC. The purpose of this session was to present information on the value of including early childhood data in longitudinal data collection. 

How to Explain the Numbers: Helping Staff, Parents, and Other Stakeholders Understand the Results of the NCSEAM Surveys for Part C (Indicator C4) and 619 (Indicator B8)

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Batya Elbaum (NCSEAM) and Pamela Roush

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 OSEP National Early Childhood Conference. This presentation discussed how making good use of data requires a common understanding of what the data mean. It also provided participants with strategies for explaining the measures and percentages that come from the NCSEAM rating scales addressing Indicators C4 and B8.

Helping Local Programs Improve Outcomes Performance Using the DAC Data Analysis Framework

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Lisa Backer, Sherry Franklin, Sharon Walsh, and Avisia Whiteman

Year: 
2012
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2012 Measuring and Improving Child and Family Outcomes Conference. How can states support the use of outcomes data at the local level to promote program improvement? In this session, two states shared how they implemented the Data Accountability Center (DAC) Analysis Framework to support local programs in analyzing data and using data for program improvement. The NC Part C program shared their work that focused on ensuring that families know their rights. Minnesota shared information about their 0-5 initiative that looked at both child and family outcomes and also more broadly across early childhood programs.

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