Data Analysis

ECO/OSEP Conference Call on Target Setting

Type: 
Webinar
Author/Presenter: 

ECO/OSEP

Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

In the Annual Performance Report (APR) to be submitted February 2010, states must set targets for child progress. Summary statements to guide target setting are still in the approval process. This information on target setting is current as of January 21, 2009. 

Looking at Data Activity

Type: 
Training Resource
Author/Presenter: 

ECO Staff

Year: 
2013
Abstract: 

This topic covers child outcomes data analysis and use. For intermediate or advanced learners, particularly those who are responsible for or interested in data management, interpretation, and reporting. Learners will:

  • Understand child outcomes data for program improvement, including for instruction, resource allocation, and professional development

Trainer and participant materials are listed on the webpage.

COSF Training Unit 4: Data Analysis

Type: 
Training Resource
Author/Presenter: 

ECO staff

Year: 
2009

Summary Statements Calculator

Type: 
ECO Tools
Author/Presenter: 

ECO Staff

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

The ECO Center has developed a summary statements calculator- a tool that allows states to take their OSEP progress category data for the three child outcomes and convert it to the summary statements which will be used for target setting. The calculator can be used to generate percentages related to the summary statements, regardless of the child outcomes measurement approach.

Family Outcomes Surveys

Type: 
ECO Tools
Author/Presenter: 

ECO Staff

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 

 

The Family Outcomes Survey is an instrument created for parents to rate the extent to which they have achieved each of the following five family outcomes: 
 
Families understand their child's strengths, abilities, and special needs.
Families know their rights and advocate effectively for their child.
Families help their child develop and learn.
Families have support systems.
Families access desired services, programs, and activities in their community. 
 
Several versions of the survey are available to download, including a number of non-English translations.

Uses and Misuses of Data on Outcomes for Children with Disabilities

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

The Early Childhood Outcomes Center

Year: 
2004
Abstract: 

The ECO Center prepared this paper to make explicit some the diverse ways in which data on outcomes can be used effectively, as well as misused. The paper provides background information for stakeholders who are involved in developing outcome measurement systems for young children with disabilities. 

Outcomes for Children Served through IDEA's Early Childhood Programs (2012)

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

The Early Childhood Outcomes Center

Year: 
2012
Abstract: 

This 2-page document summarizes the analyses of the FFY 2010 child outcomes data submitted by states to OSEP in February 2012.

Outcomes for Children Served through IDEA's Early Childhood Programs

Outcomes for Children Served through IDEA's Early Childhood Programs

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Hebbeler, K. and Taylor, C.

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

This 2-page document summarizes the analyses of the FFY 2009 child outcomes data submitted by states to OSEP in February 2011.

What do the Numbers Mean? Making Sense out of Outcome Data

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler, ECO at SRI 

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Results Matter State Conference. Provides information on how to transform assessment information into child outcome data that can be used for federal reporting and program improvement. 

Using Family Survey Data for Program Improvement

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Don Bailey, Jim Henson, Melissa Raspa, Pam Roush, and Maureen Sullivan

Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2009 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

This session shared guidance materials and offered suggestions for analyzing and using family survey data collected with a variety of different approaches for program improvement. Presenters from West Virginia and Vermont highlighted how they have begun using family survey data for program improvement and discuss lessons learned and suggestions to address the challenges that they have encountered.

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