Child Outcomes Summary Process/COSF

OSEP's Revised Child Outcomes Reporting Requirement for Part C and Part B/619 Programs: What the Changes Mean for States

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

The Early Childhood Outcomes Center

Year: 
2006
Abstract: 

On August 10, 2006, The Office of Special Education Programs revised their reporting requirement for Part C and Part B/619 programs related to child outcomes. This document summarizes those changes and describes the new reporting categories and what they mean. Implications for states in the process of developing their outcomes measurement systems are discussed. 

What's New? Child Outcomes Training and TA Materials

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Ted Burke, Barbara Cohen, Darla Gundler, Michelle Lewis , and Pat Sue Spear 

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2011 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. Included new state-developed training and TA products featured in the pre-conference workshop,  including child videos to promote observational and child development skills (Department of Defense), Emotion-Based Digital Stories (MA-Part C), web-based resources, and online training modules on assessment, child development, and use of the Child Outcomes Summary process (NH-Part C, WI-619, IL-Part C). Participants discussed how, why, and when to use these products and methods for maximum effect!

What do the Numbers Mean? Making Sense out of Outcome Data

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler, ECO at SRI 

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Results Matter State Conference. Provides information on how to transform assessment information into child outcome data that can be used for federal reporting and program improvement. 

What Did States Learn from Child Outcomes Pilots and Field Tests?

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Sherry Franklin and Steve Snipes (NC Part C), and Sandy Loerch Morris and Richard Sanders (WA Part C)

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

Two states (WA and NC) shared their experiences from piloting or field testing the Child Outcomes Summary Form (COSF) to collect child outcomes data in their states. They shared the processes they implemented, the feedback they received from their early efforts, and the changes they made as a result.

Using COSF Implementation Surveys to Identify Improvement Activities

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Lisa Backer (MN 619) and Kim Carlson (OH 619)

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2010 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

Surveys of providers and administrators can help States identify issues that may influence data quality and plan technical assistance and training activities. Examples from Minnesota and Ohio were presented, including content and methodology of their surveys, key findings, and how they utilized results to develop improvement activities.

Training Strategies and Resources for States Using the Child Outcomes Summary Form

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Mary Anketell and Deb Daulton (PA Birth-5 TA), Chelsea Guillen (IL Part C), Saundra Harrington (VA Part C), and Mary Peters (WI 619)

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

Presenters described their state's efforts to train providers in the use of the Child Outcomes Summary Form (COSF). The discussion addressed the content and format of the training, how they are "rolling it out" statewide, issues they have faced, and lessons learned.

The Basics of Quality Data and Target Setting

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Lynne Kahn (ECO at FPG)

Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Held at the 2009 OSEP National Early Childhood Conference and hosted by the ECO Center, this data workshop focused on current issues and challenges related to analyzing child and family outcomes data and covered the basics of quality data and target setting. Data templates were provided for states using the Child Outcomes Summary Form (COSF) as well as for states using other assessments for outcomes reporting.

State Variations in the Child Outcome Summary Form Process

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Lisa Balivet (AK Part C) and Christine DeMer (WYPart C)

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

Although many states are using the Child Outcome Summary Form (COSF), each state has made adaptations to the form and processes to fit the unique context and needs in their States. Two states shared how they are implementing the COSF including variations in policies, guidance, and resources.

Provider Perceptions of the COS Process

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Lauren Barton and Cornelia Taylor (ECO at SRI)

Year: 
2012
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2012 Measuring and Improving Child and Family Outcomes Conference. ECO staff presented findings from ENHANCE, a project studying how well the Child Outcomes Summary (COS) process produces meaningful data. Results from a survey of providers (N=850) were described, including questions about training experiences, provider knowledge, COS process approaches, perceived accuracy, and impact of the COS process on practice.

Patterns in Child Outcomes Summary Data: Analytic Approaches and Early Findings from the ENHANCE Project

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Lauren Barton, Donna Spiker, Cornelia Taylor 

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2011 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. This session presented a brief update on the status of ENHANCE, a research project investigating the validity of data from the Child Outcomes Summary (COS) process and identifying factors related to quality data. Presenters shared preliminary findings from the analysis of state data being conducted as part of ENHANCE. Content focused on techniques being used in the study for interpreting patterns to understand the validity of the data. Materials were provided to support states in analyzing the quality, consistency, and meaning of their own COS data.

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