Accountability

Privacy and Confidentiality: TA Resources

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Jennifer Tschantz (DaSy ), Baron Rodriguez (DaSy, SLDS, PTAC )

Year: 
2013
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2013 Improving Data, Improving Outcomes Conference. This session provided an overview of relevant resources for Privacy and Confidentiality for Part C and 619 programs as they integrate data systems.

Issues in Designing State Accountability Systems

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Gloria Harbin, Beth Rous, Mary McLean

Year: 
2004
Abstract: 

The purpose of this working document is to provide a resource for state policy makers and researchers who are interested in collaboratively designing and implementing rigorous and systematic accountability models that yield accurate data.

IDEA's early childhood programs: Powerful vision and pesky details

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Hebbeler, K., Spiker, D., & Kahn, L. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 31(4), 199-207.

Year: 
2012
Abstract: 

In this article, the authors examine how national policy can affect local practice, what has been learned from the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act's (IDEA) early childhood programs and discusses how ecological theory provides a useful framework for understanding how IDEA directly and indirectly influences services to young children with disabilities and their families. While 25 years of implementing Part C and Part B Preschool confirms the power of IDEA's vision, that experience also exposes barriers to effective nationwide implementation. Issues in four areas of implementation are discussed: access to services, the quality of services, cost and funding, and outcomes. New opportunities in these areas, as well as new challenges, are now being identified in the call for building coordinated and integrated early childhood systems in states.

States' Experiences Preparing for the OSEP On-Site Results Activity

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Susan Boone, Susan Evans, Sherry Franklin, Terry Harrison, Christina Kasprzak, Joy Markowitz, and Lisa Wasacz 

Year: 
2011

Results Not Demonstrated

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Lynne Kahn (NECTAC and ECO at UNC/FPG), Christina Kasprzak (NECTAC and ECO at UNC/FPG), Judy Swett (PACER Center), and Jennifer Tschantz (OSEP)

Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

Plenary session presented at the 2008 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

Assessment and Accountability for Programs Serving Young Children with Disabilities

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Hebbeler, K., Barton, L.R., & Mallik, S. (2008). Assessment and accountability for programs serving young children with disabilities. Exceptionality, 16, 48-63.

Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

This article reviews issues related to the use of assessments in providing outcome data, discusses challenges in conducting valid assessments with young children for accountability purposes, and outlines decisions states must make related to assessment as they design and implement outcome measurement approaches. Considerations related to the use of standardized or curriculum-based measures are discussed, along with other choices related to the use of assessment for accountability.

Accountability for Services for Young Children with Disabilities and the Assessment of Meaningful Outcomes: The Role of the Speech-Language Pathologist

Type: 
Paper/Report
Author/Presenter: 

Hebbeler, K. & Rooney, R. (2009). Accountability for services for young children with disabilities and the assessment of meaningful outcomes: The role of the speech-language pathologist. Language, Speech, and Hearing in Schools, 40, 446- 456.

Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

This article describes the federal accountability requirements related to young children with disabilities and the contribution of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) to provide these data through the use of authentic, functional assessments. The article summarizes recent state and federal developments related to assessment for accountability and draws on the recommendations of national organizations to underscore the importance of high-quality assessment for guiding practice and for documenting child outcomes for accountability. The widespread use of recommended practices for assessment will provide children, families, and practitioners, including SLPs, with the highest quality assessment information while providing states and the federal government with much-needed valid data on child outcomes for accountability purposes.

Integrating Accountability Efforts across Early Childhood Programs

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Patricia Cameron (MA 619) and Beth Rous (KY Birth-5)

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

In this facilitated discussion from the 2007 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference, two states shared their experiences and lead participants in a discussion of the challenges and considerations in developing collaborative and integrated accountability strategies across multiple early childhood programs in states.

Ensuring Sustainable Change: The Long and Winding Road

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Martha Diefendorf

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2011 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. The path to achieving high quality services and positive outcomes is long and may even be winding but there are sign posts, maps and starlight to help you navigate where you want to go. If you like the destination and want to stay there, what arrangements need to be made and who can help? This session looked at key elements of systems improvement frameworks that can be used to support and sustain ongoing program improvements that benefit children and families.

Critical Issues in Early Childhood Assessment and Accountability

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler (ECO at SRI)

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. Kathy Hebbeler, ECO, defines child assessment, describes the uses of assessment, and discusses the criticial issues of child assessment within the context of program accountability.

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