Conference Session

What's New? Child Outcomes Training and TA Materials Workshop (Pre-Conference)

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Ted Burke, Ruth Chvojicek, Barbara Cohen, Chelsea Guillen, Darla Gundler, Michelle Lewis , David Lindeman, Peggy Miksch, Phoebe Rinkel, Pat Sue Spear, and Naomi Younggren 

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2011 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. Explored popular methods for training and TA on outcomes, such as video, web, and on-line modules. Developers demonstrated new products and discussed with participants how, why, and when to use them for maximum effect. Interactive activities helped participants experience the products'€™ intended use.

What's New? Child Outcomes Training and TA Materials

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Ted Burke, Barbara Cohen, Darla Gundler, Michelle Lewis , and Pat Sue Spear 

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2011 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. Included new state-developed training and TA products featured in the pre-conference workshop,  including child videos to promote observational and child development skills (Department of Defense), Emotion-Based Digital Stories (MA-Part C), web-based resources, and online training modules on assessment, child development, and use of the Child Outcomes Summary process (NH-Part C, WI-619, IL-Part C). Participants discussed how, why, and when to use these products and methods for maximum effect!

What is NIRN?

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Dean Fixsen

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 OSEP National Early Childhood Conference. This presentation provided an opportunity for participants to discuss ideas and issues about implementation frameworks that can guide efforts to move science-to-service more effectively and more efficiently to result in better outcomes for children and families. Topics addressed included taking research to practice and the most effective means of implementation in the human service arena.

What Does CEDS (the Common Education Data Standards) Have To Do With Us?

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Missy Cochenour, Meredith Miceli, and Tony Ruggiero 

Year: 
2012
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2012 Measuring and Improving Child and Family Outcomes Conference. In this session, presenters discussed why Part C and Section 619 programs should pay attention to Common Education Data Standards (CEDS). The presenters also provided an overview of the Common Education Data Standards, demonstrated the tools available to state users, and described how Delaware is using CEDS in the development of their integrated EC data system.

What do the Numbers Mean? Making Sense out of Outcome Data

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler, ECO at SRI 

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Results Matter State Conference. Provides information on how to transform assessment information into child outcome data that can be used for federal reporting and program improvement. 

What Did States Learn from Child Outcomes Pilots and Field Tests?

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Sherry Franklin and Steve Snipes (NC Part C), and Sandy Loerch Morris and Richard Sanders (WA Part C)

Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2007 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

Two states (WA and NC) shared their experiences from piloting or field testing the Child Outcomes Summary Form (COSF) to collect child outcomes data in their states. They shared the processes they implemented, the feedback they received from their early efforts, and the changes they made as a result.

Welcome and Overview to the 2012 Conference

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Kathy Hebbeler, Lynne Kahn, Christy Kavulic, Meredith Miceli, Rhonda Spence, and Michael K. Yudin 

Year: 
2012
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2012 Measuring and Improving Child and Family Outcomes Conference. As part of the opening address, presenters shared some background information and insights in their outcomes work.

Using the Child Outcomes Measurement System (COMS) Self-Assessment Tool for State Planning and Action

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Lauren Barton, Kathy Hebbeler, and Ruth Littlefield 

Year: 
2011
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2011 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference. This session was intended to assist states in using the COMS Self-Assessment Tool, a tool developed as a resource for states to guide outcomes measurement systems improvement activities. New Hampshire described the process they followed to help identify their planning priorities and activities to improve their measurement system. Session participants conducted activities in small groups to explore potential ways of using the tool and reflected on how the tool might be used in their states to improve how data are collected and used.

Using Family Survey Data for Program Improvement

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Don Bailey, Jim Henson, Melissa Raspa, Pam Roush, and Maureen Sullivan

Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2009 Measuring Child and Family Outcomes Conference.

This session shared guidance materials and offered suggestions for analyzing and using family survey data collected with a variety of different approaches for program improvement. Presenters from West Virginia and Vermont highlighted how they have begun using family survey data for program improvement and discuss lessons learned and suggestions to address the challenges that they have encountered.

Using Early Childhood Outcomes Data for Program Improvement: Opportunities for Higher Education

Type: 
Conference Session
Author/Presenter: 

Presented by Cornelia Taylor, Lisa K Backer, and Christina M Kasprzak.

Year: 
2010
Abstract: 

Presented at the 2010 DEC Conference. This panel addressed data-driven program improvement in ECSE and opportunities for researchers in higher education to mine and analyze existing state data. Specific topics included: data quality, state and program level data elements and evaluation questions, analysis, and detecting meaningful differences in population based data.

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